Content of Character

When Martin Luther King said, “I look to a day when people will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character” (in his I have a dream speech), he was, of course, referring specifically to racial disparities. Unfortunately, racial disparities haven’t disappeared, and perhaps even more unfortunately, our culture has added a variety of other disparities by which we judge people. Like skin color, they are all superficial in nature and say nothing about the content of their character.

The first thing that occurs to me is the bias many hold . . . → Read More: Content of Character

Changing Channels

A recent Internet news article, “Want To Look Smarter? Stop Sending Emails And Speak Like A Human,” by Emily Peck, reminded me of the ways communication channels influence the meanings of messages. The principal communication channels fall into three general classes: visual (what we see), auditory (what we hear), and kinesthetic (touch, taste, smell, and emotional response). Although neither the article nor the study on which it is based specifically addresses the concept of channel richness, that is basically what the article is about.

Face-to-face (F2F) is considered the richest communication channel because it conveys the most information. Assuming . . . → Read More: Changing Channels

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

My guess is that readers of this blog already know that oxygen is a principal key to the health and well-being of life on Earth. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is a way of delivering oxygen directly to the blood, tissue, and other bodily fluids. Although it is often done in a hospital setting, especially in burn units, some individuals have purchased units for their own use. HBOT chambers come in two varieties, hard chamber (HBOT) and soft chamber (mHBOT). Hard chamber units are able to employ higher pressure to address certain kinds of problems best treated in hospital settings, although . . . → Read More: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

New Directions

Those of you who have been regular readers of this blog know that we’ve recently been through a winter of discontent and spent some time south of the border. Now that spring has arrived in Michigan I thought it was time to give my blog a facelift with new header images, a new title, and new overarching theme: Embracing Reality. The theme is a result of my having been influenced by a saying from Byron Katie’s book, Loving What Is, in which she says that When you argue with reality, you lose—but only 100 percent of the time. If you’ve . . . → Read More: New Directions

What You Say Is What You Mean

Mitt Romney’s “47 percent” comments have become a well-known example of how a person’s mouth can get him or her into trouble, especially in these days of cell-phone video and YouTube. The moral of the story is that people (you, me, and Mitt Romney) need to be aware that the demarcation between “private” and “public” has become increasingly fuzzy.

Even when people are being careful with their language and know that others will hear or read what they say, choice of words and manner of delivery may say more than was intended. In a recent column in the New . . . → Read More: What You Say Is What You Mean

Yes, No, or It Depends?

In some ways this blog entry ties back to my previous posts on Choice Points: “Forks in the Road” and Evidence Procedures. One of the things I have been noticing about recent political debates is how often people, and perhaps especially politicians, seem to be absolutely sure of so many things.

Bell Curve

In statistical terms, when we measure most populations on most scales (such as height, weight, IQ, education, age at death, etc.) the result is the familiar bell shape of Pareto’s Law.

It make sense: Some people are really tall, some are really short, and most . . . → Read More: Yes, No, or It Depends?

Forks in the Road

I don’t very often write extended book reviews for my blog, but I am making an exception for Choice Points: When You have to Decide Which Way to Go, by Phil Hollander, Robert Reaume, and Harvey Silver. (See Amazon.com for more.) It is an excellent book in more ways than one. I will say more about those ways, but first, a bit of background:

In the interests of full disclosure, I need to say that I know one of the authors, Phil Hollander. We first met in 1994 at an NLP training with Richard Bandler in Toronto. We have . . . → Read More: Forks in the Road

Evidence Procedures, Part 2

It has been almost two months since my last blog entry. I have been busy, and a lot has been happening, some of which I thought would make good posts, and some of which interfered with my writing. In that category, if you have been following Debra’s and my SCS posts, you know that Debra needed to have a complete hysterectomy. She is now recovering and still hoping to spend the coming winter in Florida, which she has been thinking of as a “healing garden.”

Some of the discussion following the shooting of the children at the Sandy Hook, . . . → Read More: Evidence Procedures, Part 2

Interventions for Hearing Loss

A version of this post also appears in the October “Beyond Mastery” newsletter.

If you have been following Debra’s and my attendance at various conferences and meetings this year, you already know that we’ve been hanging out with some of the best healers in the country. This article describes the interventions I have received along the way, primarily for my principal presenting problem of hearing loss. My hearing had been declining for at least the last 10 years.

One of the things about hearing loss is that it is subtle. When your vision gets blurry, you can see . . . → Read More: Interventions for Hearing Loss

Wellness for All

This blog entry, which I am cross posting to the SCS Beyond Mastery Newsletter, could have been called “Adventures in Kinesiology,” as in some ways, it is a follow-up to my blog from 22 April, Adventures in Mesotherapy. Debra and I have just returned from the 37th Annual TFH Conference, where I experienced two powerful healing sessions from people attending the conference. But first, a bit of background information:

The training complex, “Hamburger University,” was connected to the Hyatt Lodge by a walking bridge over Lake Fred, which I suspect was named for Fred Turner, who followed . . . → Read More: Wellness for All